WOODSTOCK — Colt Ford never wavered on how he was going to make an impact on the country music scene. His voice wouldn’t let him.

“I can’t sing very good,” Ford said.

The upside for a male country act is that he can rely on any number of other attributes to mask a voice that, while far from a screech, may not necessarily melt listeners’ hearts. There’s basically an unwritten book on it from which Ford, who performs Friday at the Shenandoah County Fair, can lift passages from the careers of many others to provide him with encouragement — legends such as Charlie Daniels, and more contemporary artists such as Toby Keith, particularly from that singer’s 2001 single, “I Wanna Talk About Me.”

Success is about creativity, strong songwriting and great music, said Ford, who talks, and raps, to listeners during his songs more so than he sings to them.

“I didn’t create something new,” he said. “You walk in a bar anywhere in America [and listen to karaoke] and say, ‘Wow, you’re unbelievable.’ That doesn’t mean you’re a good entertainer.”

The “300-pound redneck rebel,” as Ford describes himself in one of his songs, seeks to win fans over through connecting with them — he’ll sign autographs, but stops short when someone is asking him to sign a newborn baby, as one woman requested — and offering them a concert experience to remember. He said he uses more steel than anyone else in Nashville.

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